Engaging your senses, particularly your sense of smell, makes you more likely to remember an event. So you want to layer your wedding ceremony with all sorts of sensual clues. Encountering them later in your life will waft you directly back to your wedding and how you felt when you married your beloved.

One easy place to include interesting spices is in your wedding bouquet. Whole spices can add interesting visuals as well. You want to be careful not to overwhelm yourself or your guests with the scents, subtle is always a good idea.

Vanilla Beans are gorgeous. Ginger flowers smell wonderfully. So do the humble clove scented carnations. What else catches your eye and your nose? Fall is a great time for deeply colored flowers and leaves, so don’t overlook the visual possibilities of your bouquet.

What spices and herbs do you particularly like? Are you more interested in apple pies, curries or a good red sauce? Do you want to use basil or thyme to include in your bouquet? Bay laurel leaves also add a wonderful scent.

You can carry a tussy-mussy (a tiny, little bouquet) rather than the gigantic offerings that are so possible today. Herbs would be a wonderful basis for a tiny bouquet. They’re also wonderful for corsages and boutonnieres.

Reach back in history and carry a pomander. This is a ball filled with aromatic spices and flowers. (If you do this, you may want to hand out this mixture as a favor to your guests in small net bags.)

Use a layer of flowers and spices to create the perfect sensual invitation to your wedding. You want to engage your community’s sense of smell as well. You’d like them to remember why you’re getting married and how wonderful the wedding was so that they can continue to support your wedding over the years. Why not take a course in spices before your wedding? This is a wonderful way to explore your differences and how they compliment one another (and how to work around them when they don’t!) Then learn to cook with them and keep your wedding alive and your marriage thriving.



Source by Ann Keeler Evans